Warehouse Inventory Control and Management


Warehouse inventory control and management systems are designed to serve a wide array of manufacturing and distribution needs. Control and management systems are available for physical plant management, including physical building analysis, property management, and building layout with rack and lane optimization. Warehouse equipment usage can also be monitored with wireless RF technology linked to systems through wireless site surveys. Wireless technology can be extended to vehicle loading and unloading operations.

The information provided from the wireless system is uploaded in real time to software specifically designed for facility management. The software is available for a wide range of businesses. Different software systems offer a full range of options for small, medium, and large businesses.

Windows based systems for warehouse inventory control and management are designed for small business of 10 or less simultaneous users and can be run on the businesses own network. Medium size business may choose from software designed to run on their own network or select a web based system. The web based systems work well for multiple location operations. Microsoft SQL Server systems designed for midsize to larger applications supply access to unlimited users. More robust Oracle based systems are designed for businesses operating globally and requiring secure operation over the internet.

Real time data reporting is one of the most desirable benefits of these completely computerized warehouse inventory control and management systems. For managing inventory flow through the warehouse, data can be collected by RFID technology inserted in the actual packaging or pallets of product. The RFID tags follow the product through the warehouse and send continuous updates to the system. Warehouse and client users can login to the system and monitor inventory pick and put data, incoming and outgoing orders and other metrics established during system setup.

Computer systems utilizing real time radio frequency bar coding technology and handheld bar code scanners offer additional solutions for tracking as it comes into and moves through the warehouse. Individual product can be scanned as orders are picked and fulfilled.

Before implementing computerized management systems, companies should identify and develop standard operating procedures. Developing efficient SOPs up front can save money. Many companies experience often experience improved safety conditions due to a properly designed system. Other areas of improvement include loading efficiencies and period end inventory reporting.

Companies looking to set up a computerized control and management system can find multiple vendors providing both software and compatible hardware for a complete and efficient system. Vendors often offer consulting and analysis services to help companies develop and improve their SOPs. Including personnel for IT and Warehousing is important in developing standard operating procedures. Their valuable experience can eliminate costly mistakes in the development of the new system. When a company considers input from both employees and vendors, efficiencies can be identified and incorporated that will serve long into the future and prevent costly modifications and redesigns. New technologies are continually being developed. Warehousing IT department should monitor changes in the industry and update management regularly.


Source by Russell Riggs